PRE-OWNED VEHICLES
© Lynch Automotive Group
Join in the conversation and share your thoughts with us!
Welcome to Lynch Mukwonago!
282 E Wolf Run, Mukwonago, WI 53149 Sales: (877) 821-1248 | Service: (877) 524-5305 | Parts: (877) 468-8817
Automobile manufacturers have raced since the very begining.  Racing serves a couple of important purposes.  First, it shows off the product to racing fans who will hopefully become customers.  Secondly, it’s a great way to test vehicle technology under extreem conditions. When the Automobile Manufacturer’s Association banned manufacturers from racing in the late 1950’s, Chevrolet did what any group of ‘car guys’ would do…they built a race car! Developed in 1959 as a race car disguised as an “engineering research vehicle,” General Motors CERV I (Chevrolet Engineering Research Vehicle #One) remained part of the automaker’s collection until 1972, when it was donated to the Briggs Cunningham Museum. Since then it’s passed through a number of high profile automobile collections.  This year at Barrett-Jackson’s Scottsdale auction, the CERV I sold for a fee-inclusive price of $1.32 million, and, as first reported by Corvette Blogger, General Motors has been confirmed as the buyer. The CERV I was engineered by Zora Arkus- Duntov and wrapped in a fiberglass body designed by Larry Shinoda (who also designed the car’s current second-generation bodywork). From 1959 through 1964, the open-wheel car was officially used for component testing and development, which delivered real-world benefits in the form of the 1963 Corvette’s independent rear suspension.  A variety of engines powered CERV I over the years, including an aluminum small block V-8, a twin-turbo V-8, and a fuel-injected 377 cu.in. V-8 used to set a 206 MPH lap at GM’s Milford Proving Ground.  By design or by chance, the car appeared at key motorsport events in-period, such as the Pikes Peak Hill Climb and the Riverside Grand Prix, though thanks to the AMA (Automobile Manufacturer’s Association) ban on racing, any laps or runs were “officially” for demonstration purposes only. Had the AMA ban been lifted, the CERV I’s 96-inch wheelbase would have met the rules to compete in the Indianapolis 500, but its rear-engine design would have been considered controversial in 1960. Even though the 1959 Formula One season was dominated by the rear-engine cars, a rear-engine car didn’t appear at the Brickyard until 1961.  It wasn’t until 1965 that a rear-engine car won at Indianapolis. By 1964, the CERV I had served its purpose and had been replaced by a second Chevrolet Engineering Research Vehicle, also built for competition it would never see.  After eight years in GM’s collection, the CERV I was gifted to Cunningham’s new Costa Mesa museum, where it remained until 1986, the year the facility shut its doors and sold its collection to Collier. Later, the CERV I found its way into Yager’s MY Garage Museum, where it remained a popular exhibit when not on display at concourses across the country. A 2015 attempt to sell the car at auction ended with the reserve not met, but last weekend’s Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale sale proved to be the right venue. Greg Wallace, manager of GM’s Heritage Center, confirmed the sale adding, “GM is proud to have the CERV I back.” Plans for the car’s future are unclear.  Legitimate arguments could be made for preservation or restoration back to its original form.  Early photos show the car wearing a simpler fiberglass body, narrow “kidney bean” magnesium wheels, and sporting a 283-cu.in. V-8 instead of the 377-cu.in. fuel-injected V-8 that powers it today. Having just reacquired the car however, GM has yet to decide what (if any) work will be carried out. Terry Rhadigan, GM’s executive director of product and technology communications, said the car’s acquisition was “an opportunity, not a strategy,” meaning that the automaker isn’t actively shopping for other such vehicles. CERV II, the successor and likely bookend to CERV I, sold at auction to an unnamed private buyer for a hammer price of $1 million in 2013. The CERV I will become part of GM’s North American Heritage Collection, housed in an 81,000 square foot complex in Sterling Heights, Michigan. Generally off-limits to the public (group tours are accepted), the facility displays roughly 165 vehicles at any given time, though the entire collection includes nearly 600 automobiles and trucks from GM’s past. Production, concept and engineering vehicles are all represented, and the collection is home to such notable lots as the 1938 Buick Y Job; the Firebird I, Firebird II and Firebird III concepts; the 1961 Corvette Mako Shark concept; the 1969 Manta Ray concept; and a mid-engine 1972 Corvette concept bodied by Reynolds Aluminum.
CERV I returns home to GM’s Heritage Collection
CERV I in itís original skin and engine configuration Circa 1960 Photo courtesy General Motors Archive.
Posted January 26, 2017
© Lynch Automotive Group
Join in the conversation and share your thoughts with us!
Lynch Chevrolet, Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram in Mukwonago
Tap for map
Posted January 26, 2017
CERV I returns home to GM’s Heritage Collection
Automobile manufacturers have raced since the very begining.  Racing serves a couple of important purposes.  First, it shows off the product to racing fans who will hopefully become customers.  Secondly, it’s a great way to test vehicle technology under extreem conditions. When the Automobile Manufacturer’s Association banned manufacturers from racing in the late 1950’s, Chevrolet did what any group of ‘car guys’ would do…they built a race car! Developed in 1959 as a race car disguised as an “engineering research vehicle,” General Motors CERV I (Chevrolet Engineering Research Vehicle #One) remained part of the automaker’s collection until 1972, when it was donated to the Briggs Cunningham Museum. Since then it’s passed through a number of high profile automobile collections.  This year at Barrett-Jackson’s Scottsdale auction, the CERV I sold for a fee-inclusive price of $1.32 million, and, as first reported by Corvette Blogger, General Motors has been confirmed as the buyer. The CERV I was engineered by Zora Arkus- Duntov and wrapped in a fiberglass body designed by Larry Shinoda (who also designed the car’s current second- generation bodywork). From 1959 through 1964, the open-wheel car was officially used for component testing and development, which delivered real-world benefits in the form of the 1963 Corvette’s independent rear suspension.  A variety of engines powered CERV I over the years, including an aluminum small block V-8, a twin-turbo V-8, and a fuel-injected 377 cu.in. V-8 used to set a 206 MPH lap at GM’s Milford Proving Ground.  By design or by chance, the car appeared at key motorsport events in-period, such as the Pikes Peak Hill Climb and the Riverside Grand Prix, though thanks to the AMA (Automobile Manufacturer’s Association) ban on racing, any laps or runs were “officially” for demonstration purposes only. Had the AMA ban been lifted, the CERV I’s 96-inch wheelbase would have met the rules to compete in the Indianapolis 500, but its rear-engine design would have been considered controversial in 1960. Even though the 1959 Formula One season was dominated by the rear-engine cars, a rear- engine car didn’t appear at the Brickyard until 1961.  It wasn’t until 1965 that a rear-engine car won at Indianapolis. By 1964, the CERV I had served its purpose and had been replaced by a second Chevrolet Engineering Research Vehicle, also built for competition it would never see.  After eight years in GM’s collection, the CERV I was gifted to Cunningham’s new Costa Mesa museum, where it remained until 1986, the year the facility shut its doors and sold its collection to Collier. Later, the CERV I found its way into Yager’s MY Garage Museum, where it remained a popular exhibit when not on display at concourses across the country. A 2015 attempt to sell the car at auction ended with the reserve not met, but last weekend’s Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale sale proved to be the right venue. Greg Wallace, manager of GM’s Heritage Center, confirmed the sale adding, “GM is proud to have the CERV I back.” Plans for the car’s future are unclear.  Legitimate arguments could be made for preservation or restoration back to its original form.  Early photos show the car wearing a simpler fiberglass body, narrow “kidney bean” magnesium wheels, and sporting a 283-cu.in. V-8 instead of the 377-cu.in. fuel-injected V-8 that powers it today. Having just reacquired the car however, GM has yet to decide what (if any) work will be carried out. Terry Rhadigan, GM’s executive director of product and technology communications, said the car’s acquisition was “an opportunity, not a strategy,” meaning that the automaker isn’t actively shopping for other such vehicles. CERV II, the successor and likely bookend to CERV I, sold at auction to an unnamed private buyer for a hammer price of $1 million in 2013. The CERV I will become part of GM’s North American Heritage Collection, housed in an 81,000 square foot complex in Sterling Heights, Michigan. Generally off-limits to the public (group tours are accepted), the facility displays roughly 165 vehicles at any given time, though the entire collection includes nearly 600 automobiles and trucks from GM’s past. Production, concept and engineering vehicles are all represented, and the collection is home to such notable lots as the 1938 Buick Y Job; the Firebird I, Firebird II and Firebird III concepts; the 1961 Corvette Mako Shark concept; the 1969 Manta Ray concept; and a mid- engine 1972 Corvette concept bodied by Reynolds Aluminum.
CERV I in itís original skin and engine configuration Circa 1960 Photo courtesy General Motors Archive.